wolbring

Archive for the ‘Publications’ Category

Expanding Ableism: Taking down the Ghettoization of Impact of Disability Studies Scholars

In Ableism, Open access publications, Peer Reviewed Papers, Publications on July 6, 2012 at 12:54 pm

Abstract: This paper highlights the utility of an expanded ableism concept beyond how it is used in disability studies; expanding the concept of ableism so it connects with all aspects of societies and making ableism applicable to many academic fields. It introduces this expanded form of ableism as a new angle of cultural research and suggests it to be one possible venue for disability studies scholars to escape the ghettoization of their impact.

in  the journal

Societies

Building an Integrative Analytical System for Recognizing and Eliminating in-Equities (BIAS) FREE Framework by Burke amnd Eichler

In Ableism, Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy, Ableism Ethics and Governance, Disability, General inquiry into, application and development of Ableism Ethics and Governance, Health, Law and public policy, Public policy, Publications, Reports on November 2, 2008 at 4:31 am

I thought the BIAS FREE framework by Mary Anne Burke (a member of the network) and Margit Eichler might be of interest to other members of this network. From the Global Forum webpage a description 

The BIAS FREE Framework: A practical tool for identifying and eliminating social biases in health research
By Mary Anne Burke and Margrit Eichler. 2006. 64 pages. ISBN 2-940286-43-4
This volume provides students, researchers and policy-makers with a new user-friendly rights-based tool for identifying and eliminating biases deriving from social hierarchies in their work. Cutting a swathe through the layers of tools researchers and policy-makers have had to apply in the past to avoid sexism, racism, ableism, classism, casteism, ageism and endless other ‘isms’ in their work, the authors offer their BIAS FREE Framework as an integrative approach to explore and remove the compounding layers of bias that derive from any social hierarchy. BIAS FREE stands for Building an Integrative Analytical System for Recognizing and Eliminating in-Equities. The acronym is the statement of a goal, not of an achievement. The authors lay out the theoretical underpinnings of the BIAS FREE Framework and the roots of discrimination – the logic of domination – common to all ‘isms of domination’. Understanding this basic conceptual interconnection among all systems of oppression is the key to unlocking them. The focus of the volume is the application of the BIAS FREE Framework for understanding how biases that derive from social hierarchies manifest in health research. The BIAS FREE Framework is applicable not just to research, but also to legislation, policies, programmes and practices. It is also transferable to any policy sector, not just health, and speaks to the needs of high- and low-income countries alike. It is an essential tool for getting at the roots of social inequalities and effecting real social change.

Disabilities among Refugees and Conflict-affected Populations

In Disability, Health, Public policy, Reports on June 30, 2008 at 1:52 am

Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children releases the first major report to address the critical needs of this all-but invisible population

The Women’s Commission has released the first major report to address the critical needs of refugees and people displaced within their own countries who suffer from physical, sensory or mental disabilities.

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that between 7 and 10 percent of the world’s population lives with disabilities. It can therefore be calculated that between 2.5 and 3.5 million of the world’s 35 million displaced people are disabled. In fact, the number of people living with disabilities may be even higher among those who have fled civil conflict, war or natural disasters.

Yet sadly, people with disabilities remain among the most hidden, neglected and socially excluded of any population in the world today. They are often not counted in refugee registration drives or identified in data collection. Because of physical and social barriers, they are unable to access mainstream assistance programs offered to other refugees. Their potential is seldom recognized. They are often seen as a problem for their families and communities, rather than a resource. What’s more, the loss of traditional caregivers—extended families, neighbors—during displacement can leave them extremely vulnerable.

Report “Disabilities among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations”here

What Sorts of Nano research: A code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Reports on May 30, 2008 at 12:22 am

here

and here

of interest to us
4.1.16 N&N research organisations should not undertake research aiming for non-therapeutic enhancement of human beings leading to addiction or solely for the illicit enhancement of the performance of the human body.

THis suggests that every other enhancement research is allowed like ‘therapeutic’ (who decides what is therapeutic), and non therapeutic work that is not used for doping purposes or leads to addictions.. Additions are mostly drug related at first glance but may be one say that one can become addicted to ones enhancements like emotionally addicted.

In general the section seem to give the go ahead to most enhancement work

Some of the other wordings of the code might be usable for us but will see.Technorati Tags: , , ,
Cheers
Gregor

What Sort of Body: Paper of interest

In Peer Reviewed Papers on May 27, 2008 at 9:13 pm

Body, Power, Desire: Mapping Canadian Body History

Lisa Helps

pp. 126-150

Journal of Canadian Studies

Volume 41, Number 1, Winter 2007

E-ISSN: 1911-0251 Print ISSN: 0021-9495

World health statistics 2008

In Health, Reports on May 23, 2008 at 1:23 pm

I added the link to the new report in my blog see here
below just one part of the content of thaTen highlights in health statistics 7-34
Progress towards MDG 5: maternal mortality 8
Coverage gap and inequity in maternal, neonatal and child health interventions 10
HIV/AIDS estimates are revised downwards 13
Progress in the fight against malaria 15
Reducing deaths from tobacco 18
Breast cancer: mortality and screening 21
Divergent trends in mortality slow down improvements in life expectancy in Europe 24
Monitoring disease outbreaks: meningococcal meningitis in Africa 27
Future trends in global mortality: major shifts in cause of death patterns 29
Reducing impoverishment caused by catastrophic health care spending 32
References
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What sorts of athletes should there be?

In NBICS, Peer Reviewed Papers on May 10, 2008 at 4:54 pm

This What sorts question many thought they had figured out is increasingly up for grasp again in all kind of areas. Athletes are one of them.  Who is an Olympic athlete?  Who is a Paralympic athlete? Who is….?  As a contribution to this discourse I wrote the article below.  It is an open access journal, so feel free to download the paper and of course any comment are welcome here or to me directly.

in SCRIPT-ed – A Journal of Law, Technology & Society

Oscar Pistorius and the Future Nature of Olympic, Paralympic and Other Sports
Gregor Wolbring, pp.139-160
| HTML | DOC | PDF |
Oscar Pistorius is a Paralympic bionic leg runner and record holder in the 100, 200, and 400 meters who wants to compete in the Olympics. This paper provides an analysis of a) his case; b) the impact of his case on the Olympics, the Paralympics and other –lympics and the relationships between the –lympics; c) the impact on other international and national sports; d) the applicability of the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. It situates the evaluation of the Pistorius case within the broader doping discourse and the reality that new and emerging science and technology products increasingly generate internal and external human bodily enhancements that go beyond the species-typical, enabling more and more a culture of increasing demand for, and acceptance of modifications of the human body (structure, function, abilities) beyond its species-typical boundaries and the emergence of new social concepts such as transhumanism and the transhumanisation of ableism.

http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/script-ed/issue5-1.asp