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Archive for the ‘Public policy’ Category

Building an Integrative Analytical System for Recognizing and Eliminating in-Equities (BIAS) FREE Framework by Burke amnd Eichler

In Ableism, Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy, Ableism Ethics and Governance, Disability, General inquiry into, application and development of Ableism Ethics and Governance, Health, Law and public policy, Public policy, Publications, Reports on November 2, 2008 at 4:31 am

I thought the BIAS FREE framework by Mary Anne Burke (a member of the network) and Margit Eichler might be of interest to other members of this network. From the Global Forum webpage a description 

The BIAS FREE Framework: A practical tool for identifying and eliminating social biases in health research
By Mary Anne Burke and Margrit Eichler. 2006. 64 pages. ISBN 2-940286-43-4
This volume provides students, researchers and policy-makers with a new user-friendly rights-based tool for identifying and eliminating biases deriving from social hierarchies in their work. Cutting a swathe through the layers of tools researchers and policy-makers have had to apply in the past to avoid sexism, racism, ableism, classism, casteism, ageism and endless other ‘isms’ in their work, the authors offer their BIAS FREE Framework as an integrative approach to explore and remove the compounding layers of bias that derive from any social hierarchy. BIAS FREE stands for Building an Integrative Analytical System for Recognizing and Eliminating in-Equities. The acronym is the statement of a goal, not of an achievement. The authors lay out the theoretical underpinnings of the BIAS FREE Framework and the roots of discrimination – the logic of domination – common to all ‘isms of domination’. Understanding this basic conceptual interconnection among all systems of oppression is the key to unlocking them. The focus of the volume is the application of the BIAS FREE Framework for understanding how biases that derive from social hierarchies manifest in health research. The BIAS FREE Framework is applicable not just to research, but also to legislation, policies, programmes and practices. It is also transferable to any policy sector, not just health, and speaks to the needs of high- and low-income countries alike. It is an essential tool for getting at the roots of social inequalities and effecting real social change.

Biden questions GOP disability advocates on stem cell research

In Ableism, Ableism Ethics and Governance and Science and Technology governance, Disability, Public policy on September 9, 2008 at 5:38 pm

It seems we are a tool again for other to push their agenda. The below write up for sure leads to certain troubling thoughts.

From CNN’s Rachel Streitfeld
here the link
COLUMBIA, Missouri (CNN) – Joe Biden suggested Tuesday that advocates for people with disabilities should “support stem cell research” — a remark that follows repeated pledges from Republican VP nominee Sarah Palin, the mother of a baby with Down Syndrome, to parents of children with disabilities that she would be “a friend and advocate in the White House.”

When asked about the issue at a Tuesday rally, Biden did not mention Palin’s name, but seemed to direct a question to her.

“I hear all this talk about how the Republicans are going to work in dealing with parents who have both the joy…and the difficulty of raising a child who has a developmental disability, who were born with a birth defect,” he said. “Well, guess what folks? If you care about it, why don’t you support stem cell research?”

Biden told voters “the disability issue is not a new issue for us” and said he and Barack Obama would support stem cell research — a political hot potato that Sarah Palin does not support because it involves the use of human embryos.

In an illustration over the controversy of stem cell research — a key issue for some conservative voters — the Republican ticket is split. John McCain supports the practice.

Filed under: Joe Biden

Disabilities among Refugees and Conflict-affected Populations

In Disability, Health, Public policy, Reports on June 30, 2008 at 1:52 am

Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children releases the first major report to address the critical needs of this all-but invisible population

The Women’s Commission has released the first major report to address the critical needs of refugees and people displaced within their own countries who suffer from physical, sensory or mental disabilities.

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that between 7 and 10 percent of the world’s population lives with disabilities. It can therefore be calculated that between 2.5 and 3.5 million of the world’s 35 million displaced people are disabled. In fact, the number of people living with disabilities may be even higher among those who have fled civil conflict, war or natural disasters.

Yet sadly, people with disabilities remain among the most hidden, neglected and socially excluded of any population in the world today. They are often not counted in refugee registration drives or identified in data collection. Because of physical and social barriers, they are unable to access mainstream assistance programs offered to other refugees. Their potential is seldom recognized. They are often seen as a problem for their families and communities, rather than a resource. What’s more, the loss of traditional caregivers—extended families, neighbors—during displacement can leave them extremely vulnerable.

Report “Disabilities among Refugees and Conflict-Affected Populations”here

What sort of coverage: Amputees fight caps in coverage for prosthetics

In Ableism, Disability, Law and public policy, Public policy on June 10, 2008 at 6:27 pm

By Dave Gram, Associated Press

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. – After bone cancer forced the amputation of her right leg below the knee, Eileen Casey got even more bad news: Her insurer told her that she had spent her $10,000 lifetime coverage limit on her temporary limb and that the company wouldn’t pay for a permanent one……more here

Comment: On the one hand society promotes a body image and a social environment that seems to make legs essential (most places are still not set up for non-leg modes of movement), and on the other hand they are not willing to enable one to have the legs.
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Nanotechnology, transhumanism and the bionic man

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Health, Law and public policy, NBICS, Public policy, Sports, Transhumanism on May 28, 2008 at 7:29 pm

this piece by nanowerk explains a lot of my reasoning quite nicely

more hereTechnorati Tags: , , , , ,

What sort of Sports

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Law and public policy, Public policy, Sports, Transhumanism on May 16, 2008 at 4:50 pm

After the Pistorius ruling the below video also seem to say

that we can all be together in sports

Double-amputee sprinter can pursue Olympic dream: ruling

In Ableism, Enhancement, Law and public policy, Pistorius, Public policy, Sports on May 16, 2008 at 4:02 pm

In a unanimous ruling, the Court of Arbitration for Sport announced Friday that double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius will have a chance to represent South Africa at the Beijing Olympics this summer.
more here

Summer Schools on Ethics of nanotechnology and on ethics of converging technologies.

In Enhancement, Law and public policy, NBICS, Public policy on May 15, 2008 at 1:49 pm

I should say that I am part of the Converging technology meeting in Sept as a faculty

The European Commission currently tries to stimulate responsible development of nanotechnology by recommending a Code of Conduct to EU member states. This Code is actually a form of “soft law”, governing nanotechnology research. Evaluators of EU project proposals are asked to use this code in their selection process. Ambitious and prudent researchers in natural as well as social sciences may want to learn more about nanoethics in general and this code in particular, and discuss the practical consequences.

The EthicSchool on Ethics of Nanotechnology offers a good opportunity for this. It is held 24-29 August 2008 at the University of Twente. Prof. Dr Arie Rip of the University of Twente and Prof. Dr. Jean-Pierre Wils of Radboud University in Nijmegen are co-presidents of the EthicSchool.

The EthicSchool on Ethics of Converging Technologies is held 21-26 September 2008 at the Dormotel Vogelsberg in Alsfeld /Omrod in Germany. Prof. Dr. Alfred Nordmann of the TU Darmstadt and an international group of renowned scholars will lead discussions at the forefront of the scientific debate on current trends in the converging sciences and technologies (nano, bio, info, cogno) and the philosophical, societal and policy implications.

PhD students, postdocs and others with a genuine interest are welcome to join the EU funded EthicSchool Summerschools. There are still a number of places left for both EthicSchools. If you are interested in presenting a paper, the deadline for submitting abstracts has been extended until 1 June 2008. Find out more and register online at http://www.ethicschool.eu

or contact Ineke Malsch: postbus@malsch.demon.nl