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Archive for the ‘Ethics’ Category

BioEdge: Ethicists give thumbs-up to infanticide

In Ableism and Law, Ableism Ethics and Governance and its intersection with Disability Ethics, Disability, Ethics, infanticide on February 25, 2012 at 5:05 pm

BioEdge: Ethicists give thumbs-up to infanticide.

 

Killing people with disabilities as a lesser crime

In Ableism, Ableism Ethics and Governance and its intersection with Disability Ethics, Disability, Ethics, Law and public policy on December 3, 2008 at 8:41 pm

Is the killing of someone with a significant disability a lesser crime than killing someone considered to be fully able? “Mercy” Killing, euthanasia, compassionate homicide, and altruistic homicide are all terms that have been used to describe the killing of of one human being by another in order to  end suffering.  Thus they are considered justifiable or even heroic. Canada has considered a compassionate homicide law and Germany currently has a euthanasia or “mercy” killing law that limits the sentence of a convicted individual to five years if the motivation was to end suffering. 

Critics, however, suggest that such laws serve as the ultimate vehicle of ableism, by effectively making it a less serious crime for those considered to be able to kill those considered to have serious disabilities.  To try to answer this question, one might think of whether “mercy” killing or compassionate homicide might be extended to people without disabilities. Would society be willing to consider the killing of a homeless person to be motivated by compassion? Might a police officer who shot a criminal to death rather than make that individual suffer through disgrace and imprisonment be considered to have committed a mercy killing? Would an individual who kills an able bodied man, who asks to end his unhappy life, be considered compassionate?

Two recent mercy-killing trials in Germany and China, help provide answers. A German court ruled that the killing of Bernd Juergen Brandes could not be considered a mercy killing, even though he asked to be killed to end his miserable life, because he did not have a disability or illness. While a Chinese court freed a mother who killed her disabled daughter, who never asked to be killed because the daughter was “a “psychological burden.” 

These and other cases suggest that compassionate homicide simply makes killing people with disabilities into a less serious crime.

Call for Papers Converging Technologies, Changing Societies

In Ableism Ethics and Governance, Call for papers, Conferences, Ethics, nano, nanoscale, nanotechnology, NBICS on October 21, 2008 at 2:51 pm

Call for Papers SPT 2009
Converging Technologies, Changing Societies

16th International Conference of
the Society for Philosophy and Technology

July 8-10 2009

University of Twente
Enschede, The Netherlands
Deadline for abstracts: January 5, 2009

SPT 2009 welcomes high quality papers and panel proposals in all areas of philosophy of technology. Given the focus of this year’s conference, papers dealing with converging technologies and their social and cultural impact are especially welcomed. SPT 2009 will include 15 tracks:

1. Converging technologies and human enhancement. Chair: Peter-Paul Verbeek

2. Converging technologies and engineering sciences. Chair: Mieke Boon

3. Converging technologies and risks. Chairs: Sabine Roeser and Sven Ove Hansson

4. Converging technologies: general issues. Chair: Armin Grunwald

5. Ethics and politics of emerging technologies. Chair: Tsjalling Swierstra

6. Philosophy and ethics of biomedical and nanotechnology. Chair: Bert Gordijn and Joachim Schummer

7. Philosophy and ethics of information technology. Chair: Adam Briggle

8. Environmental philosophy and sustainable technology. Chair: Andrew Light

9. Philosophy of engineering and design. Chair: Pieter Vermaas

10. Robots, cyborgs and artificial life. Chairs: Mark Coeckelbergh and Gianmarco Veruggio

11. Technology and moral responsibility. Chair: Katinka Waelbers

12. Technology, culture and globalisation. Chairs: Charles Ess and Evan Selinger

13. The good life and technology. Chair: Philip Brey

14. Philosophy of technology: general and assorted issues. Chair: Anthonie Meijers

15. Reflective engineering. Chair: Darryl Farber

Descriptions of the tracks can be found on our website http://www.utwente.nl/ceptes/spt2009 .

Thanks to Adam for sending it

Recent Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics issue

In Ableism, Conferences, Enhancement, Ethics, Law and public policy, Religion on October 15, 2008 at 7:50 pm

has different articles on different Religion’s views on enhancement.

see here

A New Zealand report on the cultural, ethical and spiritual aspects of pre-birth testing by Toi te Taiao: the Bioethics Council

In Ableism, Ethics on June 23, 2008 at 1:14 am

some far reaching recommendations such as
Recommendation 9
There is insufficient cultural, ethical and spiritual reasons to prohibit the use of preimplantation
genetic diagnosis for sex selection for social reasons such as ‘family balancing’.

more hereTechnorati Tags: , , , , ,

What Sorts of Laws? Finding the Gaps

In Disability, Ethics, Law and public policy on May 12, 2008 at 4:32 pm

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities entered into force on May 3, 2008. In order to clarify the potential impact of that Convention’s articles, the National Council on Disability (NCD) is pleased to release: Finding the Gaps: A Comparative Analysis of Disability Laws in the United States to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). This independent analysis was commissioned by NCD to help increase understanding of how the CRPD varies from, or is consistent with, U.S. disability laws. We hope that it will prove to be a useful tool as those responsible for determining public policy on possible support or ratification of this treaty grapple with the relative merits of that choice.
The document can be found here .

HTML and PDF formats will be posted shortly over here .

What sorts of people in the Chronicle of Higher Education

In Disability, Ethics, Law and public policy, NBICS on May 12, 2008 at 2:42 pm

Genetic, And Moral, Enhancement online here From the issue dated May 16, 2008

Years of Toil in the Lab Yield a New Field online here From the issue dated May 16, 2008

Medical Genetics Is Not Eugenics online here From the issue dated May 16, 2008