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Archive for the ‘Enhancement’ Category

Emerging Therapeutic Enhancement Enabling Health Technologies and Their Discourses: What Is Discussed within the Health Domain?

In Enhancement on July 26, 2013 at 1:05 am

Wolbring Gregor Diep Lucy, Yumakulov Sophya, Ball Natalie, Leopatra Verlyn (2013) Emerging Therapeutic Enhancement Enabling Health Technologies and Their Discourses: What Is Discussed within the Health Domain? Healthcare 20131(1), 20-52

http://www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/1/1/20

So far, the very meaning of health and therefore, treatment and rehabilitation is benchmarked to the normal or species-typical body. We expect certain abilities in members of a species; we expect humans to walk but not to fly, but a bird we expect to fly. However, increasingly therapeutic interventions have the potential to give recipients beyond species-typical body related abilities (therapeutic enhancements, TE). We believe that the perfect storm of TE, the shift in ability expectations toward beyond species-typical body abilities, and the increasing desire of health consumers to shape the health system will increasingly influence various aspects of health care practice, policy, and scholarship. We employed qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate among others how human enhancement, neuro/cognitive enhancement, brain machine interfaces, and social robot discourses cover (a) healthcare, healthcare policy, and healthcare ethics, (b) disability and (c) health consumers and how visible various assessment fields are within Neuro/Cogno/ Human enhancement and within the BMI and social robotics discourse. We found that health care, as such, is little discussed, as are health care policy and ethics; that the term consumers (but not health consumers) is used; that technology, impact and needs assessment is absent; and that the imagery of disabled people is primarily a medical one. We submit that now, at this early stage, is the time to gain a good understanding of what drives the push for the enhancement agenda and enhancement-enabling devices, and the dynamics around acceptance and diffusion of therapeutic enhancements.

Bionic Contact Lens

In Ableism and general human performance enhancement;, Ableism Ethics and Governance and Design, Ableism Ethics and Governance and Science and Technology governance, Body, Enhancement on May 2, 2009 at 3:14 pm

he University of Washington’s Parviz Research Group is actively developing a contact lens containing embedded circuitry to enhance vision. The technologies developed could be the building blocks of future products such as lenses that allow zoom capability, advanced video devices for use with cell phones, or even image enhancement overlays such the heat-maps shown in Predator…..

article here

The underground world of “neuroenhancing” drugs.

In Ableism and Cognition, Ableism and general human performance enhancement;, Ableism Ethics and Governance and Science and Technology governance, Cognition, Enhancement, Neurotechnology on April 22, 2009 at 3:17 pm

by Margaret Talbot April 27, 2009

Every era has its defining drug. Neuroenhancers are perfectly suited for our
efficiency-obsessed, BlackBerry-equipped office culture.

Keywords Neuroenhancing Drugs; Neuroenhancers; Students; Adderall;
Stimulants; Smart Drugs; Underground

more here

Ian Kerr and I were successful in receiving a grant

In Ableism, Enhancement on April 15, 2009 at 2:19 am

Our grant covers enhancement technologies is from SSHRC and is for three years.

Int J of Disability, Community and Rehabilitation Special Issue on Nanotechnology, Disability, Community and Rehabilitation

In Ableism, Ableism and general human performance enhancement;, Ableism Ethics and Governance and Science and Technology governance, Body, Enhancement, nano, nanotechnology on March 25, 2009 at 12:39 am

New in the Int J of Disability, Community and Rehabilitation (IJDCR)

The issue can be found here

An IJDCR Special Issue on Nanotechnology, Disability, Community and Rehabilitation edited by Gregor Wolbring,
Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies Program, Dept of Community
Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada

Articles:

Editor’s Introduction to the Special Issue, by Gregor Wolbring

If Nanotechnology Were a Magic Wand What Obligations Would it Bring? Or:
The Right to Enhance Versus the Right to Morphological Freedom, by Heather
Bradshaw

Optimization of Human Capacities and the Representation of the Nanoscale
Body, by Michele Robitaille

Nanotechnology: Changing the Disability Paradigm, by Laura Cabrera

The journal welcomes submissions on a continuous basis that focus on nanoscale and nanoscale-enabled science and technology as it impacts on disabled people and the broader community and the role of rehabilitation professionals, family members and others.

Recent Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics issue

In Ableism, Conferences, Enhancement, Ethics, Law and public policy, Religion on October 15, 2008 at 7:50 pm

has different articles on different Religion’s views on enhancement.

see here

Two new pieces from me

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Human nature on July 2, 2008 at 5:18 pm

Peer reviewed article
Is There an End to Out-Able? Is There an End to the Rat Race for Abilities?
whole issue on able

from my column
From morphological freedom to morphological judgment
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The Miracle of Bionics – Presenting Challenging Questions

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, NBICS, Pistorius, Sports on June 2, 2008 at 5:35 pm

another piece covering Bionic advances and that quotes me a lot that just came out.
more here
Cheers
Gregor
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What Sorts of Nano research: A code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Reports on May 30, 2008 at 12:22 am

here

and here

of interest to us
4.1.16 N&N research organisations should not undertake research aiming for non-therapeutic enhancement of human beings leading to addiction or solely for the illicit enhancement of the performance of the human body.

THis suggests that every other enhancement research is allowed like ‘therapeutic’ (who decides what is therapeutic), and non therapeutic work that is not used for doping purposes or leads to addictions.. Additions are mostly drug related at first glance but may be one say that one can become addicted to ones enhancements like emotionally addicted.

In general the section seem to give the go ahead to most enhancement work

Some of the other wordings of the code might be usable for us but will see.Technorati Tags: , , ,
Cheers
Gregor

Nanotechnology, transhumanism and the bionic man

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Health, Law and public policy, NBICS, Public policy, Sports, Transhumanism on May 28, 2008 at 7:29 pm

this piece by nanowerk explains a lot of my reasoning quite nicely

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