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Archive for the ‘Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy’ Category

Hospital Denies Kidney Transplant to Girl With Intellectual Disability

In Ableism and Cognition, Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy, Ableism Ethics and Governance and its intersection with Disability Ethics on January 15, 2012 at 4:53 pm

Hospital Denies Kidney Transplant to Girl With Intellectual Disability.

via Hospital Denies Kidney Transplant to Girl With Intellectual Disability.

Philosophy PhD position in Bioethics Within the project ENABLE – Protecting Vulnerable Persons in Health Care

In Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy on June 18, 2009 at 4:28 pm

Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School

Philosophy
PhD position in Bioethics

Within the
project ENABLE – Protecting
Vulnerable Persons in Health Care (supervisor: Samia Hurst), the Institute for Biomedical Ethics at the
University of Geneva Medical School is opening one
PhD position for a philosophy doctoral candidate. This project is
funded by
the Swiss National Science Foundation.
In
collaboration with the project
supervisor and within an interdisciplinary team, the successful
candidate’s
work will explore how vulnerability in health care can be defined
analytically,
as well as sources of claims for protection of the vulnerable, how
convincing
they are, and what effect their validity may have on fairness in
resource
allocation decisions. Projected duration for this position is four
years.
Salary is according to the University of Geneva scale (A2
assistant, 70%, approx. 46’000 CHF per annum the first year). Within
this time
frame, the successful candidate will be expected to complete a PhD
thesis in
philosophy under the (co-)supervision of Bernard Baertschi,
on a
topic broadly within the area of normative ethics and/or applied
ethics.
The ideal
candidate should have a
Master’s degree in philosophy or equivalent, including courses in
bioethics,
normative ethics, applied ethics, and/or political philosophy, and at
least
intermediate mastery of written English.

Please send
your CV, a writing
sample, and letter of motivation to: Samia.hurst@unige.ch
Before: August
15th 2009
Any relevant
publications (max. two)
should be attached to the application and will be considered an asset.
Interviews
will be held in
September.

— Dr Samia Hurst Institut d’éthique biomédicale CMU/1 rue Michel Servet 1211 Genève 4 – Switzerland Tel: +4122-3793479 Fax: +4122-3793472 Blog: http://forumethix-ch.blogspot.com/ Homepage: http://ib.unige.ch/SH_homepage.php SGBE-SSEB: http://www.bioethics.ch/content/default.htm

Expert Group Meeting on Mainstreaming Disability in Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) policies, processes and mechanisms: Development for All

In Ableism and design, Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy, Ableism and Sustainable Development, Environmental Security on May 17, 2009 at 4:51 pm

results from the meeting and background documents here

Building an Integrative Analytical System for Recognizing and Eliminating in-Equities (BIAS) FREE Framework by Burke amnd Eichler

In Ableism, Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy, Ableism Ethics and Governance, Disability, General inquiry into, application and development of Ableism Ethics and Governance, Health, Law and public policy, Public policy, Publications, Reports on November 2, 2008 at 4:31 am

I thought the BIAS FREE framework by Mary Anne Burke (a member of the network) and Margit Eichler might be of interest to other members of this network. From the Global Forum webpage a description 

The BIAS FREE Framework: A practical tool for identifying and eliminating social biases in health research
By Mary Anne Burke and Margrit Eichler. 2006. 64 pages. ISBN 2-940286-43-4
This volume provides students, researchers and policy-makers with a new user-friendly rights-based tool for identifying and eliminating biases deriving from social hierarchies in their work. Cutting a swathe through the layers of tools researchers and policy-makers have had to apply in the past to avoid sexism, racism, ableism, classism, casteism, ageism and endless other ‘isms’ in their work, the authors offer their BIAS FREE Framework as an integrative approach to explore and remove the compounding layers of bias that derive from any social hierarchy. BIAS FREE stands for Building an Integrative Analytical System for Recognizing and Eliminating in-Equities. The acronym is the statement of a goal, not of an achievement. The authors lay out the theoretical underpinnings of the BIAS FREE Framework and the roots of discrimination – the logic of domination – common to all ‘isms of domination’. Understanding this basic conceptual interconnection among all systems of oppression is the key to unlocking them. The focus of the volume is the application of the BIAS FREE Framework for understanding how biases that derive from social hierarchies manifest in health research. The BIAS FREE Framework is applicable not just to research, but also to legislation, policies, programmes and practices. It is also transferable to any policy sector, not just health, and speaks to the needs of high- and low-income countries alike. It is an essential tool for getting at the roots of social inequalities and effecting real social change.

Innovating for the health of all: Innovation in systems of research for health and health equity Havana, Cuba, 16-20 November 2009

In Ableism, Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy, Conferences on October 31, 2008 at 7:01 pm

Forum 2009
Innovating for the health of all:
Innovation in systems of research for health and health equity

Havana, Cuba, 16-20 November 2009

The Global Forum for Health Research is delighted to announce that its 2009 Forum meeting will take place in Havana at the invitation of the Ministry of Health of Cuba, from 16-20 November 2009.

As you know, Forum meetings bring together a wide range of stakeholders from around the world – policy-makers, development specialists, funders and leaders of research, representatives of civil society, NGOs, the media and the private sector – to engage in dialogue, to identify lessons learned from experience and to identify pathways to solutions.

Forum 2009 will focus on innovations in how systems of research for health are organized, managed, financed and applied. It will:

– highlight innovations that are already, or could be, contributing to strengthening systems of research for health and health equity;

– examine the results of research and innovation in key areas including, for example, equitable finance mechanisms in health systems;

– explore pivotal factors that are important in improving the organization of research and innovation systems to achieve more equitable health outcomes.

A definition of what we understand by innovation in systems of research for health and health equity is on our web site http://www.globalforumhealth.org.

As we begin our planning, we would like to open a call for contributions to make one of the outstanding events that the Global Forum has become known for. The deadline for submissions will be 15 January 2009 and you will be able to submit your ideas as of 1 December 2009 on our web site http://www.globalforumhealth.org. We welcome submissions from all sectors and all geographical locations, from young researchers as well as leaders in all fields relevant to research and innovation for health.

To receive future Forum 2009 announcements, please sign up here:

http://www.globalforumhealth.org/shlinks/forum2009.php

My colleagues and I look forward to your contributions. Cuba offers an exceptional setting for Forum 2009, as an attractive and vibrant location and as the focal point for national and regional examples of innovation. We hope you will be able to join us there.

Stephen A. Matlin

Executive Director

Final report WHO Commission on social determinants of health

In Ableism and its intersection with health ethics, care and policy on September 9, 2008 at 5:50 pm

here