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What Sorts of Nano research: A code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Reports on May 30, 2008 at 12:22 am

here

and here

of interest to us
4.1.16 N&N research organisations should not undertake research aiming for non-therapeutic enhancement of human beings leading to addiction or solely for the illicit enhancement of the performance of the human body.

THis suggests that every other enhancement research is allowed like ‘therapeutic’ (who decides what is therapeutic), and non therapeutic work that is not used for doping purposes or leads to addictions.. Additions are mostly drug related at first glance but may be one say that one can become addicted to ones enhancements like emotionally addicted.

In general the section seem to give the go ahead to most enhancement work

Some of the other wordings of the code might be usable for us but will see.Technorati Tags: , , ,
Cheers
Gregor

Nanotechnology, transhumanism and the bionic man

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Health, Law and public policy, NBICS, Public policy, Sports, Transhumanism on May 28, 2008 at 7:29 pm

this piece by nanowerk explains a lot of my reasoning quite nicely

more hereTechnorati Tags: , , , , ,

What Sort of Body: Paper of interest

In Peer Reviewed Papers on May 27, 2008 at 9:13 pm

Body, Power, Desire: Mapping Canadian Body History

Lisa Helps

pp. 126-150

Journal of Canadian Studies

Volume 41, Number 1, Winter 2007

E-ISSN: 1911-0251 Print ISSN: 0021-9495

World health statistics 2008

In Health, Reports on May 23, 2008 at 1:23 pm

I added the link to the new report in my blog see here
below just one part of the content of thaTen highlights in health statistics 7-34
Progress towards MDG 5: maternal mortality 8
Coverage gap and inequity in maternal, neonatal and child health interventions 10
HIV/AIDS estimates are revised downwards 13
Progress in the fight against malaria 15
Reducing deaths from tobacco 18
Breast cancer: mortality and screening 21
Divergent trends in mortality slow down improvements in life expectancy in Europe 24
Monitoring disease outbreaks: meningococcal meningitis in Africa 27
Future trends in global mortality: major shifts in cause of death patterns 29
Reducing impoverishment caused by catastrophic health care spending 32
References
Technorati Tags: , , ,

What sorts of image?

In Disability on May 21, 2008 at 1:52 pm

Select Bibliography of Children’s Books about the Disability Experience
something i added to my blog
see here
I added more book ideas here in a new post on my blog

What Sorts of athlete? Tomorrow’s sports stars: Is talent all in the genes?

In Sports on May 19, 2008 at 1:36 pm

more here

Pistorius decision of the Court of Arbitration for Sports

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Pistorius, Sports on May 17, 2008 at 1:06 am

see here for the Court of Arbitration for Sports decision
and here the press release

My two main thoughts after reading the ruling and the press release are

1) The ruling I assume will be interpreted to be a ruling against the scientific data claiming that the cheetah legs lead to an unfair advantage. The ruling leaves the door open that one could exclude a runner with prosthetics from competing in a ‘natural leg’ running event if it can be proven that the ‘artificial’ legs lead to an unfair advantage.
This makes sense . So far the process of investigating theses new ‘artificial’ legs is not developed enough to be called a golden standard so its open for interpretations. Once tests are developed that are accepted as the golden standard and they show an unfair advantage one can see that that runner won’t be allowed to run against the ‘biological leg’ runners.

2) However the ruling seems to give the answer to another question. Are the Olympics about athletes who have a body adhering to the norm of the homo sapient species? In other words is the Olympics about athletes with a ‘normal biological body’? The ruling cements the view that the Olympics are not about biological bodies per se. So one can compete in the Olympics independent of whether certain biological parts are replaced by artificial parts.
If the replacement does not lead to a competitive advantage athletes with artificial body parts can compete against athletes where the body part in question is biological and not artificial.
If the replacement does leads to a competitive advantage one could see the ruling opening the door for the scenario where the athletes with artificial body parts compete against each others in the Olympics
whereby the artificial body parts are treated like a pole used in pole vaulting…
Cheers
Gregor

What sort of Sports

In Ableism, Disability, Enhancement, Law and public policy, Public policy, Sports, Transhumanism on May 16, 2008 at 4:50 pm

After the Pistorius ruling the below video also seem to say

that we can all be together in sports

Double-amputee sprinter can pursue Olympic dream: ruling

In Ableism, Enhancement, Law and public policy, Pistorius, Public policy, Sports on May 16, 2008 at 4:02 pm

In a unanimous ruling, the Court of Arbitration for Sport announced Friday that double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius will have a chance to represent South Africa at the Beijing Olympics this summer.
more here

Summer Schools on Ethics of nanotechnology and on ethics of converging technologies.

In Enhancement, Law and public policy, NBICS, Public policy on May 15, 2008 at 1:49 pm

I should say that I am part of the Converging technology meeting in Sept as a faculty

The European Commission currently tries to stimulate responsible development of nanotechnology by recommending a Code of Conduct to EU member states. This Code is actually a form of “soft law”, governing nanotechnology research. Evaluators of EU project proposals are asked to use this code in their selection process. Ambitious and prudent researchers in natural as well as social sciences may want to learn more about nanoethics in general and this code in particular, and discuss the practical consequences.

The EthicSchool on Ethics of Nanotechnology offers a good opportunity for this. It is held 24-29 August 2008 at the University of Twente. Prof. Dr Arie Rip of the University of Twente and Prof. Dr. Jean-Pierre Wils of Radboud University in Nijmegen are co-presidents of the EthicSchool.

The EthicSchool on Ethics of Converging Technologies is held 21-26 September 2008 at the Dormotel Vogelsberg in Alsfeld /Omrod in Germany. Prof. Dr. Alfred Nordmann of the TU Darmstadt and an international group of renowned scholars will lead discussions at the forefront of the scientific debate on current trends in the converging sciences and technologies (nano, bio, info, cogno) and the philosophical, societal and policy implications.

PhD students, postdocs and others with a genuine interest are welcome to join the EU funded EthicSchool Summerschools. There are still a number of places left for both EthicSchools. If you are interested in presenting a paper, the deadline for submitting abstracts has been extended until 1 June 2008. Find out more and register online at http://www.ethicschool.eu

or contact Ineke Malsch: postbus@malsch.demon.nl